Dr. Itai Pessach, Medical Director at Intensix to Present at ISICEM 2017

Reposted from prweb

Findings show that continuous analysis of the modified SOFA score by an intelligent automated system can detect and predict significant clinical outcomes

Intensix, developer of a real-time predictive analytics platform for prediction of patient deterioration in the ICU and high acuity departments of hospitals, announced today that the company’s Medical Director, Dr. Itai Pessach will be presenting at the 37th International Symposium on Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine (ISICEM).

The poster presentation will discuss a segment of the results achieved as part of Intensix proof of concept trial at the Tel Aviv Medical Center. The presentation will focus on a computerized model used to continuously calculate a modified SOFA score to predict patient outcomes in the ICU. The analysis and model development was performed on a database of 629 septic patients with severe hemodynamic instability events admitted to a general ICU in a tertiary medical center between 2007 and 2014, and validated in 92 patients with such events admitted during 2015.

The International Symposium on Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine is organized by the departments of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine of Erasme University Hospital, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, in association with the Belgian Society of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine (SIZ). The meeting is one of the largest in its field, now attracting more than 6000 participants from countries world-wide. The objectives of this four day symposium are to provide participants with an up to date review of the most recent, clinically relevant, developments in research, therapy, and management of the critically ill.

Dr. Pessach is a Senior Pediatric Critical Care Physician and the Deputy Director of the Edmond and Lily Safra Children hospital, Sheba Medical Center. Dr. Pessach is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Tel-Aviv University. He is certified in allergy immunology and in pediatric critical care. He has a broad background in basic and clinical research and has published extensively in the fields of pediatric immunology and critical care. Dr. Pessach holds an MD, Ph.D. degree from the Ben-Gurion University and has trained both at Sheba medical center as well as at Children’s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School.

About Intensix

Intensix provides healthcare providers and administrators with high-accuracy predictive analytics that improve clinical outcomes and reduce hospital costs. The Intensix innovative analytics solution detects deterioration in real-time and delivers predictive warnings during all phases of a patient’s stay in the ICU and other high-acuity departments. Driven by innovative predictive modelling and advanced high-dimensional analytics techniques, the Intensix platform has the flexibility to manage entire patient populations as well as individualized treatment needs.


Findings from Sheba Medical Center in Pancreatic Cancer Provides New Insights

Reposted from Pharmacy Choice

Findings from Sheba Medical Center in Pancreatic Cancer Provides New Insights (Overall survival and clinical characteristics of BRCA mutation carriers with stage I/II pancreatic cancer)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Cancer Weekly Investigators publish new report on Oncology – Pancreatic Cancer. According to news reporting out of Ramat Gan, Israel, by NewsRx editors, research stated, “BRCA1/BRCA2 germ line (GL) mutation carriers with pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) may have distinct outcomes. We recently described an apparent more favourable prognosis of surgically resected BRCA-associated PDAC patients in a single-arm, uncontrolled, retrospective study.”

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Sheba Medical Center, “However, the prognostic impact of GL BRCA1/2 mutations in surgically resected PDAC has not been compared with a matched control population. A larger multi-centre, case-control retrospective analysis was performed. Cases were patients with surgically resected, BRCA1/2-associated PDAC from 2004 to 2013. Controls included surgically resected PDAC cases treated during the same time period that were either BRCA non-carriers, or had no family history of breast, ovarian or pancreatic cancers. Cases and controls were matched by: age at diagnosis (within ?5-year period) and institution. Demographics, clinical history, overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were abstracted from patient records. Statistical comparisons were assessed using ch-and Fisher’s exact test, and median DFS/OS using Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank testing. Twenty-five patients with BRCA1-(n=4) or BRCA2 (N=21)-associated resectable PDAC were identified. Mean age was 55.7 years (range, 34-78 years), 48% (n=12) were females and 76% (n=19) were Jewish. Cases were compared (1 : 2) with 49 resectable PDAC controls, and were balanced for age, ethnicity and other relevant clinical and pathological features. BRCA-associated PDAC patients received neoadjuvant, or adjuvant platinum-based treatment more frequently than controls (7 out of 8 vs 6 out of 14) and (7 out of 21 vs 3 out of 44), respectively. No significant difference in median OS (37.06 vs 38.77 months, p=0.838) and in DFS (14.3 vs 12.0 months, p=0.303) could be demonstrated between cases and controls. A trend to increased DFS was observed among BRCA-positive cases treated with neoadjuvant/adjuvant platinum-containing regimens (n=10) compared with similarly treated controls (n=7) (39.1 vs 12.4 months, p=0.255). In this retrospective analysis, the prognosis of surgically resectable BRCA-associated PDAC is no different than that of sporadic PDAC from the same institution.”

According to the news editors, the research concluded: “The role of platinum-based adjuvant therapy in this setting requires prospective investigation.British Journal of Cancer (.”

For more information on this research see: Overall survival and clinical characteristics of BRCA mutation carriers with stage I/II pancreatic cancer. British Journal of Cancer, 2017;():. (Nature Publishing Group – www.nature.com/; British Journal of Cancer – www.nature.com/bjc/)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting T. Golan, Dept. of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan 52621, Israel. Additional authors for this research include T. Sella, E.M. O’Reilly, M.H. Katz, R. Epelbaum, D.P. Kelsen, A. Borgida, H. Maynard, H. Kindler, E. Friedmen, M. Javle and S. Gallinger (see also Oncology – Pancreatic Cancer).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Israel, Genetics, Oncology, Ramat Gan, Epidemiology, Gastroenterology, Pancreatic Cancer, Pancreatic Neoplasms.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2017, NewsRx LLC


New Neuroimmunology Study Results from Sheba Medical Center Described

Reposted from 4-traders
02/16/2017 | 01:02pm EDT

New Neuroimmunology Study Results from Sheba Medical Center Described (RAM-589.555 a new Polymerase-1 inhibitor as innovative targeted-treatment for multiple sclerosis)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Pain & Central Nervous System Week — Researchers detail new data in Nervous System Research – Neuroimmunology. According to news reporting originating from Ramat Gan, Israel, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, “Targeting Polymerase-1 (POL1) transcription machinery is a new strategy for suppression of multiple sclerosis (MS) disease activity that is based on suppression of ribosomal biogenesis and subsequent activation of apoptosis.”

Financial support for this research came from Israel Ministry of Trade and Industry – Nofar – Industry Program (see also Nervous System Research – Neuroimmunology).

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Sheba Medical Center, “We developed an oral POL1 inhibiting compound RAM-589.555, that suppress ribosomal biogenesis as an innovative therapeutic approach to ameliorate MS. RAM-589.555 shows high permeability, specificity to POL1 pathway, ability to induce apoptosis and to inhibit proliferation and viability of activated lymphocytes both in vitro and in-vivo.”

According to the news editors, the research concluded: “Moreover, oral administration of RAM-589.555 blocks ribosomal RNA transcription and significantly suppresses and ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE).”

For more information on this research see: RAM-589.555 a new Polymerase-1 inhibitor as innovative targeted-treatment for multiple sclerosis. Journal of Neuroimmunology, 2017;302():41-48. Journal of Neuroimmunology can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Bv, PO Box 211, 1000 Ae Amsterdam, Netherlands. (Elsevier – www.elsevier.com; Journal of Neuroimmunology – www.journals.elsevier.com/journal-of-neuroimmunology/)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting M. Gurevich, Sheba Med Center, Multiple Sclerosis Center, IL-52621 Ramat Gan, Israel. Additional authors for this research include R. Zilkha-Falb, R. Mashiach and M. Gurevich.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2017, NewsRx LLC

(c) 2017 NewsRx LLC, source Health Newsletters








Sheba Medical Center’s National Newborn Screening Program saves eight potential ‘Bubble Babies’

SHEBA NEWS – December 15, 2016

From: PR Sheba – Ulrike Haen

Sheba Medical Center’s National Newborn Screening Program saves eight potential ‘Bubble Babies’

Babies with SCID (Severe Combined Immunodeficiency), who used to die or be kept for years in “bubbles” because they lacked any immune system to protect them, undergo bone marrow transplants and are cured of the condition.

At Sheba’s Sigi and Marilyn Ziering National Center for Newborn Screening, headed by Prof. Moshe Almashano, the blood of every newborn baby in Israel is tested the day after he or she is born. A simple procedure, where a drop of blood from the heel of the baby is collected through pinprick puncture and is smeared and soaked on a pre-printed collection card, called Guthrie card, then immediately delivered and tested at the Sheba Medical Center. 180,000 babies were born and tested in 2016.

By screening the blood for SCID, hypothyroidism and a number of other diseases such as PKU (phenylketonuria – an inborn error of metabolism that results in reduced metabolism of the amino acid phenylalanine; if untreated, it can lead to intellectual disability, seizures, behavioral problems and mental disorder), future disabilities and sometimes fatal disorders can be avoided, sometimes through a simple change of diet and in cases of SCID by bone marrow transplant.

Prof. Raz Somech, head of the pediatrics B department of Sheba’s Edmond and Lily Safra Children’s Hospital and head of the Israel Society for Primary Immunodeficiency, finally succeeded, last winter, to get the SCID test included in the basket of the Israeli Health Service. Eight potential ‘bubble babies’ were detected, underwent bone marrow transplant and were cured of the condition.

Prof. Somech is leading this national project and his pediatrics B department was chosen and received the international acknowledgement of the prestigious Jeffrey Modell Foundation (JFM) for Clinical and Research Excellence in Primary Immunodeficiencies. JMF has developed a global network of specialized centers for diagnosis, clinical care, and research to find treatments and cures for primary immunodeficiencies. Prof. Somech’s department is one of them.

Learn more about the Sheba Medical Center at www.sheba.co.il